Process scheduler assignment

This is a fairly quick and fun (for me, at least) blogpost about something I have to consider for a university assignment.

The assignment revolves around developing a scheduler in C++ that could theoretically be applied as a process scheduling algorithm for an operating system. We were given a code spec to conform to, which consists of class and functions definitions for a integer Stack, Queue and Scheduler. The assignment mandates that we make all three paradigms operational (no surprise). Implementing the first two things was easy, but building a scheduler requires a lot of thinking. Thanks to the specification and the assignment briefing, we are shown that the scheduler operates with 10 priority levels (0 – lowest, 10 – highest) and it bares some relation (inheritance) to the Queue functionality.

You might be thinking: “Woah there Khalid, lot more thinking? Processing tasks based on priority levels is easy ’cause you just select the highest priority items first and go from there…”. Well in theory, that is an easy concept to understand. BUT with that specific approach, you could experience one of the most breaking problems in scheduling.

Blocking.

Blocking (which is the phenomenon where low priority tasks are ‘blocked’ from being processed by high priority tasks) could effectively break the integrity of a system that is supposed to take on more and more tasks whilst operating (like our process scheduler). Whilst those low priority tasks are supposed to be… well… low priority, they are not irrelevant and will need processing eventually. Even in scenarios where tasks are not added during operation (schedulers that have a predefined task list to complete), sequentially processing items from highest to lowest could result in the lower ones never being touched (at least until after an unreasonable amount of  time) since there could be a huge amount of set items!

Imagine we have a system that has a million high priority tasks but just one low priority task. If the scheduler is processing sequentially, it will take a huge amount of time to reach that one low priority task. Surely, there has to be a better way?

With the use of some more processing power, there is. But you’re gonna have to wait to find out! I’m currently having an interesting time trying to select an appropriate method. I’ll likely report my findings after the assessment is submitted (because I do not want to give the answer away).

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