Rapidly building a design from scratch

Apologies for missing Thursday’s update. I was quite busy that day.

Anyway. So this is the second ship I’m designing for Starfleet’s Path to 2265. It is required for Chapter 2, and it’s a small UESPA ship designed to fill a void.

UESPA-20 (SS Polaris) of 2085.

The design borrows some elements from Masao Okazaki’s designs at The Starfleet Museum, with the nose being inspired by the Bison-class and its offshoots. But the rest of the design is still overall primitive compared to any 2150s ship. The design is not complex, and was developed very quickly. It actually started as two different design concepts I made about a month ago in preparation for its eventual inclusion in Chapter 2. My spec called for a small UESPA ship designed to be fast for its era and undertake early escort duties. As long as the ship was small, there were no real size specifications.

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Original study drawings

Yesterday (after a month of waiting), I finally continued with the design by computerizing both drawings into scaled models with fixed deck heights. Minor design adjustments were made.

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CAD designs (2D Design V2)

And now today, I jumped straight onto detail with the second model married to the upper structure of the first model. The nacelle was also moved to the vertical center of the ship

polaris_stage_3

I tried to project a small design via large windows, and I made the design seem long to convey a seek and fast design. Hopefully, it will be finished in time for the next Thursday update!

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UESPA-9 finished, early warp reactors added

Well, I’ve just finished my UESPA-9 design in time for today’s update! Take a look at the development of the design:

uespa9_final
Late-August to mid-October 2017 development

I should make it clear than not everything about the design is finished. An orthographic and internal schematic is yet needed to give a complete picture, but this complete sideview will be enough to allow me to begin incorporating the design into the website fully. By the end of today, I should have most of the ship’s database entry done. By this time next week, I should also have a few paragraphs about the ship written for insertion into chapter 1. For now, you can read more about the design here!

Another significant addition to the website is a section of the (currently only UESPA) database dedicated to warp reactors. Since reactors are probably the single best way to signify technological development in starships, I decided it was time to put some attention there. Currently, information on the Cochrane-type fusion, Yoyodyne-type pulse fusion, and Cochrane II-series fusion reactors is present (which are written in chapter 1 and 2 to be the most prominent reactors in the mid-to-late 21st century). A Yoyodyne II-type pulse fusion reactor page will be done within the next few days to compliment the completion of the DY-732-class ship database entry next Thursday.

Have a good evening!

“Space Boomers” chapter

When I completed the draft to chapter 1 of the website’s History repot, I wrote the blog post “Rationalising and solving UESPA problems” to complement it and show some of the thought behind it. Today I have put up chapter 2, which mainly deals with the formation of the Earth Cargo Service (ECS) and reactor progress for the UESPA. I will not be writing a post that large on here for it. Just a brief.

So. The ECS was a major theme of two episodes of Star Trek: Enterprise (“Fortunate Son” and “Horizon”), where it is shown to be an agency responsible for governing the operations of Earth freighters. This chapter follows a similar sort of format to the first one, combining what we know canonically with my own creative approach of bringing it to life; explaining political, economic, and social reasons for the development of the ECS and contemporary ships.

Enjoy!
http://pathto2265.com/history/c2

A new button (again) and the first Star Trek: Discovery ship review

So,the website has a new logo (again)!

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I’ve also been experimenting with colours. I want the Red/Blue theme, but I want it to be easy on the eyes too.

The biggest addition is the first starship review, which is of USS Shenzhou from Star Trek: Discovery. All things considered, I gave it a weighting of 6.3/10. I should have the rest of the Federation background ships from the Battle of the Binary Stars done soon. Other than that, not much to report really.

First week back to UNI!

So, it begins. Another year of work towards my future. My first impressions of the Year 2 (technically year 3 out of 4 considering my foundation year) modules are good. I am looking forward to all of them. I’m happy! 🙂

So, the modules.

Data Structure & Algorithms with Object-Orientated Programming is mainly C++, so who can complain? The Professionalism module ultimately involves building a game with the Unity engine in a group. We were put into teams based on our performance last year (apparently heavily weighted towards programming). I was put into Team 1 and so far the team seems great to work with! Tool Development for Computer Games (using Python and C#) and Computer Graphics (OpenGL-based) are great. Operating Systems Concepts, which focusing on how operating systems work, is interesting. The math module Computational Mathematics, unlike last year, actually involves some programming later on, so it is a welcomed change from the very static and boring maths module last year.

Coupled with all these modules, I have given myself a new weekly schedule that commands that I study certain topics for (at least) a set amount of time. These additional study periods are fully welcomed – I enjoy studying, and I feel it is a necessity that will allow me to continue the development and maintenance of my skills. I also needed something to fill out my Monday (which is completely free of lectures and tutorials) and days that I finish UNI early etc. Most of these scheduled study times are in 4-hour blocks, and exclusively involve C#, C++, Unity, Python, Website Development, OpenGL and “language of the week/month”. Most of these relate to what I do in a module that involves the subject, but Website Development is independent and currently dedicated towards my Starfleet’s Path to 2265 website, and “language of the week/month” is dedicated for me to explore a new programming language. For the next few weeks, this will be Java. Lua and Haskell are next!

Hopefully I will get back into the routine of personal blogposts again, since it has all been about my Star Trek-themed website for the last few weeks (posts about Starfleet’s Path to 2265 will be confined to Thursdays). I do want to document my progress throughout university more closely and share my academic experiences! 🙂

Just a new button image, really

Due to starting a new semester this week, I will now be confining my time for everything in a schedule. 6PM to 10PM on Thursdays is dedicated for this website, which gives me 3 and a half hours of actual work and 30 minutes to write an update on this blog. Since I have been busy trying to quickly get back into the routine of university life, I have not done much this week.

The only noticable change is the new home button image. It’s just a plain white version of the “UFP” text from the 23rd century Federation banner. The favicon has also been updated according (albeit black instead).

testing_desktop_20170928
The size of the “UFP” button image is subject to change.

Chapter 1 is mostly complete at this stage, only requiring the addition of my UESPA-9 design. Ship information on Bonaventure is complete, and Friendship is almost complete. In preparation for Chapter 2, a DY-732 database entry will be worked on soon. Chapter 2 primarily focuses on the development of the Earth Cargo Service (hence the chapter title “Space Boomers”), but it will also include UESPA and civilian ships from roughly 2080 to 2110. Already there are database entries for some of these ships; Emmette (from the Star Trek: Enterprise title sequence), aforementioned DY-732, and Declaration (which includes Enterprise XCV-330). There will probably be more ships in the chapter as well, likely including some of the later DY series ships.

Well, that’s it for today!

Rationalising and solving UESPA problems

(I think it is safe to designate Thursday as the Starfleet’s Path to 2265 development update day.)

Since my last update: UESPA-9 design is taking a bit longer to complete. I am still on the detail phase, stuck trying to prevent the design from looking too advanced for its area. But that in itself inspired me to write this short essay today. The other notable update was the acquisition of the domain for the website.

uespa9_stage5
Here’s a preview of the detail on UESPA-9 so far! Check out my last update for more information behind the design.

Anyway, let’s get into this.

The United Earth Space Probe Agency (UESPA), the best-known agency for Earth’s pre-Starfleet exploration missions, has a few seemingly very advanced designs that The Powers that Be of Star Trek thought were fitting. I am by no way criticising the aesthetics of those designs as I personally like them, but they seem too advanced for being designed, constructed and launched only a few years after Zefram Cochrane’s warp flight and deadly conflicts like World War III. SS Valiant (canon mission designation, non-canon visual design) and SS Conestoga (fully canon design) are examples of two fully-functional deep space vessels launched way less than a decade after the Cochrane’s achievement. Whilst writing the first chapter of my website, this has presented a few challenges for me to overcome since I have to rationalise these canon or well-known non-canon designs, and then fill gaps with my own designs based on canon designs! One thing I should also point out is that only a few decades after these designs, civilians then had unprecedented access to space via things like the DY-500-class and the Earth Cargo Service.

There were two solutions I could chose in my mind to the problem. One, Earth had most of the technology mastered thanks to military advancement in spatial travel due to World War III. Two, first contact inspired humanity to race to the stars at an astonishing rate.

Based on how things turned out in World War I and II, the first solution can seem plausible since many innovations and/or wide-scale adoptions were made in those deadly conflicts that we take for granted, in most fields of science. Examples include things like tracked-based vehicle development, nuclear development, aviation advancement, and even the adoption of penicillin! There is one elephant in the corner though. Probably the biggest requirement for deep space travel is a solid, powerful reactor system. If nuclear fusion or even matter/antimatter technology was available in WWIII, surely the level of destruction granted from those immature (for mid-21st century humans) technologies would be far greater than 600 million dead and Earth’s majority recovery in only a decade or so?

Now considering the second solution, it is clear that it is more idealistic to think that all of humanity embraced a brighter future right on the spot in 5th April 2063. We are aware of a well-established post-atomic horror that lasted for a few decades, which resulted in some humans retaining the ‘old ways’ for a large period of time. However, this is Star Trek and I think large amounts of optimism is not out of reach. So I have developed the premise of my UESPA writing based on this solution. But, with a twist. The UESPA could have simply duplicated Cochrane’s reactor and nacelle designs (I’d like to think of Cochrane’s Warp reactor as a fusion reactor, instead of a matter/antimatter reactor) to begin with and scaled them up. We have done similar things in our history, even with spacecraft such as the Boeing X-37 (which is a 120% scaled derivative of the Boeing X-40). Early ships such as SS Valiant uses a system of multiple Cochrane reactor clones, and then most of the spaceframe technology is derived from earlier space programs. The only technologies that would be considerably different (or invented) from now to then is gravity generation, radiation shielding and weapons. Seeing as Star Trek seems to indicate that the Eastern countries were worse off, I have written than the strongest American, European or Eurasian countries spearheaded these advanced programs in an effort to rebuild Earth with whatever we could hope to find in space. Whilst the governments were exploring options, a guy from Montana launches an ex-nuclear missile with an advanced propulsion system that his isolated team developed. He gains the attention of the Vulcans, and the most stable governments of Earth realise that space IS the answer. After hearing from the Vulcans that there are indeed other sentient lifeforms in the universe as well, Earth establishes the UESPA and human ambition pushes us to the stars in only a few short years.

Now the specifics. I have written that the UESPA was founded after a popular uprising began to persuade the rebuilding governments that Earth’s future was in the stars. Which even from my perspective today, Earth’s position future in the stars might be a necessity – we will eventually need more living space, and new and unusual building materials or food products from some planet out there would be cool too. So in light of the WWIII disaster, I think it’s safe to assume a space-based economy using the resources from other planets is the logical solution. This rebuilding effort is definitely a gamble, but since Earth is unwilling to suffer more, humanity takes the bet. The UESPA designs the first explorers as large boxes with Cochrane’s engine designs to find these new worlds. Deep space probes with antimatter technology follow (but I have written that the lack of methods to properly mass-produce antimatter results in Earth being stuck with fusion for at least 6 or 7 decades) to seek out new life and civilisations to make friends with and trade with. Colony ships come not long after suitable planets for human expansion are discovered. To add balance, I have peppered in a few large accidents that indicate the immature state of this advanced technology (my UESPA-9 design is one of them – an ambitious but fatal design). The rest you’ll have to see on the website itself.

I have had other issues to resolve too, such as the timeline placement of the Bonaventure spacecraft seen in the background of a few Star Trek episodes – it’s clear it exists, but it was once attributed to the discovery of Warp! My website’s Articles section will eventually have pages detailing those minor decisions.

For today though, that’s enough (1,000+ words)! See you next week!