Snow in Treforest

It kind of took me by surprise. It has been about a decade (from what I remember) since it last snowed well in Wales – long enough to forget what snow even feels like. So, when I woke up to see that my street is now completely blanketed after a day or so of snowing, I couldn’t contain the urge to just walk and have some fun in it!

The result: one of the best days I have had in a while! I have previously talked about my love of the simple pleasure of being outside and walking, but combine that with this soft and pretty snow and I just didn’t want to not be in it! Throughout the day, I made four different voyages into the snow equalled a combined 20,500 steps (as per Google Fit). My legs are pretty tired to say the least, as fighting the fairly strong wind and the resistance of large piles of snow did take a little bit of a toll but every moment was worth it!

There are a few notable examples of fun or interesting things I did in the day – including spots of photography, banter with friends etc. But the one that left the biggest and most personal impression was this moment when I was walking alone past World of Groggs on my last trip of the day at around 2050 hours. Imagine a setting of this usually busy street now blanketed in vibrant-white snow and silent of human contamination. Where the force of the gentle wind becomes audible and snow creaks as you tread. For some random reason, I looked back when I was walking in this setting and realised how much devoid of human life this street now was. At first, the I got this deep feeling that I was truly alone for a second – like if I were to scream, no one would hear me. But when I turned back around, I realised how beautiful and calm my surrounds were. I could now enjoy this surrounding to the point where all scares and cares went straight out of me and walked home with a smile!

I think that moment will stick with me for a while. I hope to be out early tomorrow for a spot of photography. Hopefully my main camera’s battery won’t die early in the day again!

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January has been hectic

Where do I begin…

January has probably been the busiest month in my entire life. No kidding! Constant work, personal projects, assignments, and very little free time to myself. But I am happy to say I have enjoyed all of it!

Since December
Since my last life update last month, I have had two coursework results back from my Computer Graphics and Tool Development for Computer Games modules. The former was a 2D OpenGL scene demonstration where we had to sample OpenGL objects and techniques and demonstrate them – from Vector Array Objects to hierarchical modelling. The demo at the time went well, and I got 88% in the end! The latter was building a Python missile command game clone with the Pygame engine and developing a small physics simulator called “Marble Madness” with a lecturer-developed engine (PGE). I had 90% on that one. So I’m happy with my performance last term to say the least!

Computer Graphics
For the second term, this module now focuses on 3D rendering in OpenGL and 3D modelling with Autodesk 3DS Max. Things have continued to go well this term, and 3D modelling is actually more fun than I imagined! It has been useful for my group project in another module as well! The programming side is obviously interesting, but we are still in the opening weeks and have not done a lot of programming for OpenGL 3D yet.

Tool Development for Computer Games
Whilst I don’t have anything against Python, the module is a lot more interesting for me this term now that we are starting to do C# GUI programming with XAML. Whilst I have done a few WinForms projects before, WPF is something I have never touched before! The coursework looks like a nice challenge too, which is to build a game level designer for a tile-based game. We are given the game and its source code and have to build the designer based on the code ourselves!

Data Structures & Algorithms With Object Oriented Programming
This module recently had a coursework due on the 12th, which was the process scheduler assignment I talked about in a post back around late-December. Basically, we were given a public API to conform to and told to fill in the blanks in C++. My scheduler ended up being a multi-level queue with a custom algorithm that creates a cycle to prevent blocking (the act of higher priority items stopping lower priority items from being processed completely). The scheduler creates a cycle in which each level of priority (from 1 to 10) gets a certain amount of attention. Higher priorities get more attention than lower ones in the cycle, but the lowers still gets *some* attention rather than none.

Other than the coursework, this term has also taken up a slightly different theme. We are now covering different design and strategy patterns to OO programming. Whilst they certainly require a bit more thought to understand, one of the two we have learnt so far has already came in handy with my web work! The observer pattern, which states the relationship between a subject (essentially some hub) and its observers (dependencies like clients), is basically the same principle of the way I’m developing this small social network in PHP for my portfolio.

Professionalism: “Project FallingStar”
Once again, the largest and most impressive thing I am involved with at University. My team has made significant progress and whilst we are far from having a complete game, the game is looking rather beautiful already! Besides defacto leadership and physics programming, I have also undertaken tasks for 3D modelling and special effects for the game. Like the last time I wrote about this, I have some little peaks for you:

Personal projects
I have also made a fair bit of progress with personal things as well. My Star Trek fan site, Path to 2265, remains a top priority for me and many improvements in the back-office have been made. The website’s search engine programming has transformed into a mature, secure and robust platform that allows the website to provide intelligent and weighted search results, whilst also providing internal benefits by allowing pages to be more dynamic and use the website’s database more. I’ve also been working on actual front-end content as well with Chapter 2 being released within a month or so and several more ships added; Polaris has a completed database entry, DY-732 has its specs mostly ironed out, and an upcoming design is due for completion soon:

stage_4
The new (but still prototype) design – UESPA battleship SS Patterson (UESPA-57)

I have also resumed limited work on my old GeckoFX-based C# browser KAubersnek. I’ve been adding a few features over the weeks and will likely continue full development when I have some time.

Capture.PNG
KAubersnek in its current state

 

Anyway, that’s it for now!

 

Process scheduler assignment

This is a fairly quick and fun (for me, at least) blogpost about something I have to consider for a university assignment.

The assignment revolves around developing a scheduler in C++ that could theoretically be applied as a process scheduling algorithm for an operating system. We were given a code spec to conform to, which consists of class and functions definitions for a integer Stack, Queue and Scheduler. The assignment mandates that we make all three paradigms operational (no surprise). Implementing the first two things was easy, but building a scheduler requires a lot of thinking. Thanks to the specification and the assignment briefing, we are shown that the scheduler operates with 10 priority levels (0 – lowest, 10 – highest) and it bares some relation (inheritance) to the Queue functionality.

You might be thinking: “Woah there Khalid, lot more thinking? Processing tasks based on priority levels is easy ’cause you just select the highest priority items first and go from there…”. Well in theory, that is an easy concept to understand. BUT with that specific approach, you could experience one of the most breaking problems in scheduling.

Blocking.

Blocking (which is the phenomenon where low priority tasks are ‘blocked’ from being processed by high priority tasks) could effectively break the integrity of a system that is supposed to take on more and more tasks whilst operating (like our process scheduler). Whilst those low priority tasks are supposed to be… well… low priority, they are not irrelevant and will need processing eventually. Even in scenarios where tasks are not added during operation (schedulers that have a predefined task list to complete), sequentially processing items from highest to lowest could result in the lower ones never being touched (at least until after an unreasonable amount of  time) since there could be a huge amount of set items!

Imagine we have a system that has a million high priority tasks but just one low priority task. If the scheduler is processing sequentially, it will take a huge amount of time to reach that one low priority task. Surely, there has to be a better way?

With the use of some more processing power, there is. But you’re gonna have to wait to find out! I’m currently having an interesting time trying to select an appropriate method. I’ll likely report my findings after the assessment is submitted (because I do not want to give the answer away).

An interesting term!

As of last Friday, I’m now off university for a few weeks. I thought it might be neat if I make a post about what I have done these last few weeks for university, so here goes!

“Project FallingStar”
…is the single biggest thing I have been involved with this term. For the Professionalism module, we were put into groups (four, five (as it is for ours) or six people) and tasked with planning and building a 3D game from scratch whilst still learning the engine we have to use (Unity). I am pleased to say I have thoroughly enjoyed the project so far! The idea for our game is that the player builds modular space probes to send out on exploration and defence missions in the solar system. Despite initial doubts that our idea was too ambitious for a bunch of UNI students, our team (designated Team 1) is working well and our recent demo was well-received! My main contributions to the team have been physics programming (producing the gravity model) and leadership (defacto, since it was something that I naturally slipped into rather than being designated).

20171219_fallingstar.png
“A little peak” – credit to team member Luke Probert, who developed this splashscreen!

OpenGL coursework
This coursework was also fun. In the Computer Graphics module, we have been learning the basics of OpenGL and the assessment was to compile a 2D OpenGL scene that makes use of advanced OpenGL features (compared to just using immediate mode rendering) such as Vector Buffer Objects (and Vertex Array Objects), hierarchical modelling, and transformations. Whilst I have to wait for my grade, the demonstration I have to my lecturer was well-received!

Python + Pygame
This coursework was interesting ’cause I both did and did not enjoy it. The coursework was split into two tasks; building a missile command game clone with Pygame and then developing a small physics sim “Marble Madness” with a lecturer-created engine. Both tasks had their merits, which for me was mainly the fun of programming. What I did not like was that we could only develop the second part on Linux since the engine (PGE) is Linux-only. Whilst I have Linux at home nor is Linux THE problem, there is really only one computer lab in the university (where I work better at than home) that has Linux. This meant I could not always be guaranteed a computer since the lab was in high demand. I was even asked to leave for another class on two occassions, with can really be inconveniencing!

So yeah, that’s what I have been up to academically! In my spare time, I am continuing the development of Path to 2265 as another personal priority. I’ve recently made some huge underlying changes that I’ll be posting about this week!

Enjoy your day!

 

Being a course rep, St Fagans, personal website

It has been quite a while since I did one of these summary update posts (at least half a year now), so let’s get into this!

Kicking this post off; for this year of studies, I decided that it was time for me to take a more active role with responsibility at my university. Since Wednesday 22nd November 2017, I am now functioning as one of three course representatives for Year 2 Computer Games Development. Basically, I’m here as the first layer of the “student academic representation network” (there are then student voice reps (SVRs) and full-time student officers above me). I am here to represent all students in my year group – they can come to me with feedback that I can then bring up at meetings with other course reps and the course leaders to improve the quality of the course. Since getting into the role, I have taken part in an initial training event thingy, a course rep assembly (involving course reps across the University), and a course rep meeting (just Game Dev and Computer Science course reps and leaders). So far, it feels great to be part of this and I hope I can be an effective and contributing course rep!

This Saturday, I went to St Fagans with my parents! They went mainly for the bread, Bara Birth, since it is literally the best bread ever! I took some photos in the subsequent walk and tried to play around with them when I got home, doing the best I can with just a mid-range smartphone camera. Some came out pretty nice, although a lot of the finer details were somewhat ruined by JPEG compression. I did some post-processing on a few of them in Photoshop to improve them as much as I can. One thing notable about this trip was that the place has changed quite a bit since the last time I went. The front museum part has been modernised and expanded, and it looks great! And they also added this cafe/workshop (pictured below) building outside too!

 

Finally, my personal website is online! See it here at http://khalidali.co.uk. It will serve as my online portfolio and general hub. It’s source code is essentially a fork of Starfleet’s Path to 2265.

First week back to UNI!

So, it begins. Another year of work towards my future. My first impressions of the Year 2 (technically year 3 out of 4 considering my foundation year) modules are good. I am looking forward to all of them. I’m happy! 🙂

So, the modules.

Data Structure & Algorithms with Object-Orientated Programming is mainly C++, so who can complain? The Professionalism module ultimately involves building a game with the Unity engine in a group. We were put into teams based on our performance last year (apparently heavily weighted towards programming). I was put into Team 1 and so far the team seems great to work with! Tool Development for Computer Games (using Python and C#) and Computer Graphics (OpenGL-based) are great. Operating Systems Concepts, which focusing on how operating systems work, is interesting. The math module Computational Mathematics, unlike last year, actually involves some programming later on, so it is a welcomed change from the very static and boring maths module last year.

Coupled with all these modules, I have given myself a new weekly schedule that commands that I study certain topics for (at least) a set amount of time. These additional study periods are fully welcomed – I enjoy studying, and I feel it is a necessity that will allow me to continue the development and maintenance of my skills. I also needed something to fill out my Monday (which is completely free of lectures and tutorials) and days that I finish UNI early etc. Most of these scheduled study times are in 4-hour blocks, and exclusively involve C#, C++, Unity, Python, Website Development, OpenGL and “language of the week/month”. Most of these relate to what I do in a module that involves the subject, but Website Development is independent and currently dedicated towards my Starfleet’s Path to 2265 website, and “language of the week/month” is dedicated for me to explore a new programming language. For the next few weeks, this will be Java. Lua and Haskell are next!

Hopefully I will get back into the routine of personal blogposts again, since it has all been about my Star Trek-themed website for the last few weeks (posts about Starfleet’s Path to 2265 will be confined to Thursdays). I do want to document my progress throughout university more closely and share my academic experiences! 🙂

Saturday was great!

Llywn-on reservoir. It is the largest of the three reservoirs in the Taff Fawr valley, Brecon Beacons National Park.

I have now revisited all three of them this year with my parents. The last time I went to these places was about a decade ago, and whilst my life has changed considerably since then, these places are as nice as I remember them. Each are large volumes of flat and relatively calm water with a ‘rangingly’ different surrounding.

Some phone photos of Llwyn-on Reservoir:

This one had a lot of forrestation around it. Whereas the first one I went to this year, the Beacons Reservoir (photos below), was mostly walled with a few interesting structures around it, and the Loops & Links path. The second one I do not have photos of, but it was similar to Llwyn-on.

Beacons Reservoir:

So if you’re in town and want a nice place to a spend a few hours or so with ranging scenes, I recommend these three reservoirs and the area surrounding them!